The Three Kinds of May Two-Four Gardeners

The three kinds of May Two-Four gardeners, and how they probably approach this weekend:

(Attention: this article is satirical)

Yes, Victoria Day, the May two-four long weekend, the unofficial beginning of cottage season. It’s the weekend that makes every hard working and borderline psychotic Canadian say to themselves, “winter isn’t so bad”. It is the weekend that we are all able to take those first deep breaths of freshly cut grass, and maybe enjoy a few beverages with people that you hopefully call your friends.Despite the common relief brought upon the by the May two-four long weekend, we are not all made a-like. So with that being said, let’s take a look at the three types of May Two-Four gardeners.

The Beer Drinker

Our first gardener on the list values efficiency above all else, and we boldly classify you as the beer drinker. This gardener loves a beautiful yard like everyone else, but the sooner the gardening is over with, the sooner you can get to sitting in your yard of glory, turning on your BBQ, and cracking open a beer. For you we dedicate a list of tips to speed things up this weekend.

 

  • Buy pre-assembled flower arrangements which typically don’t have to be planted. These could include potted arrangements or hanging baskets
  • If you are planting veggies, you can purchase pre-spaced strips of seeds. These can placed in your garden, covered in soil, and with daily watering will be ready before you know it.
  • Take advantage of our online store and let us bring the plants to you. There’s nothing better than optimizing your time at home like finger shopping on our website.

The Wine Drinker

The next gardener on the list comes in as the wine drinker. Let me just say that this particular gardener has a special place in my heart, because this gardener (embarrassingly enough) is me. You see this weekend as the perfect opportunity to blend all of your favourite things into one great Mimosa of an experience. The task of gardening, is equal to the gratification of the results. The idea of sitting in the garden all day with a glass of wine by your side is perfection.  For you, wine drinker, we have list of ways to enhance your gardening experience this weekend.

 

  • Come in and take advantage of our basket design service to perfect the colour balance and vibes in your yard.
  • Try and utilize our wide selection of vegetable plants to incorporate edible living into your home oasis. Who said veggie gardens have to be traditional? Go ahead, put those Tomatoes next to those Begonias.
  • Try and use perennials in such a way that you have blooms rolling all season long. Come in and pick our brains on how that can be done.

The Tea Drinker

The final gardener on our list breaks the mold a little and does not succumb to temptation like the rest of us. For they are the tea drinkers. The garden is their happy place all spring, and all summer. You are the prototypical green thumb, and in tune with mother nature like few others. To you, we offer no advice, for we are not deserving, we just bow towards you in the green and luscious glory that is your garden. The only thing we pass your way is this:

 

You just keep doing you.

 

No matter what type of gardener you are, this long weekend gives us that extra time to go through our gardens and spruce things up so we can better enjoy them all summer long. Our door is always open, so come on in, or take advantage of our online store to save you time, you deserve it.

Try our online store

What Moms Favourite Flower Says About Her

Because this week is all about mom, let's take a look what her favourite flowers might say about her

Roses

As expected, roses are associated with passion and beauty. If mom loves to receive roses then she is most certainly a beautiful woman and does not shy away from a tough conversation. Each colour of rose has a different meaning. A yellow rose can symbolize new beginnings and lavender rose symbolizes a new found love (oh la la). Try and impress her by putting lots of thought into which colour of roses you get her this year.

Lilacs

Lilacs are known to represent being youthful so no doubt, mom has an energy and vibrancy about her. Her skin glows and when she walks into the room everybody becomes noticeably happier. She has that effect on people.

Daisies

If this is moms favourite flower then she just might be the life of the party. She encourages the adventure inside of you and makes you feel like you can do anything. If you are at a party and people are laughing, mom is most likely at that center of that.

Petunias

Whether or not Petunias are your moms favourite flower, we recommend getting Petunias for the mom that you may not see enough. Maybe mom lives a bit far away. You can tell her that you have gotten her Petunias because you miss her and you wish you could spend more time with her.

Let us know in the comment section below if any of this is true about your mom, or if you have any other flower stories that relate to mom


Adding Fall Colour to your Garden

The Ontario countryside in the fall is a spectacular colourful landscape that we all admire and enjoy.

Many of us make special trips to view the brilliant colours of maples, and waysides adorned with fall wildflowers.  But where is the colour in our own gardens?

In planning our gardens, we very logically begin at the beginning.  Spring flowering bulbs are followed by the early flowering shrubs, and then summer is filled with Roses, Weigela, and Mockorange among many others.

Soon our garden is fully planted and only in September do we realize we could use some colour with late flowering shrubs and those with brilliant fall foliage.

Burning Bush is the most popular shrub that is widely used for fall colour, but there are many more that can enhance your garden in the fall and extend your season of colour to the fullest.

Here is a list of trees and shrubs that we think will bring amazing colour to your garden:

Burning Bush................................................Red foliage

Butterfly Bush...............................................Purple/White/Pink blooms

Cotoneaster..................................................Red berries

Dogwood.......................................................Reds and orange foliageBlack berries. Red/Yellow Twigs

Ginkgo.............................................................Yellow foliage

Holly.................................................................Red berries

Hydrangeas...................................................Pink/White/Red blooms

Katsura............................................................Orange and Red foliage

Maple Red......................................................Red foliage

Maple Sugar..................................................Orange and Red foliage

Oak Pin............................................................Red foliage

Oak Red..........................................................Red foliage

Serviceberry...................................................Yellow and Orange foliage

Sumac.............................................................Orange/Red foliage

Viburnum.......................................................Orange/Red foliage and black berries

 

 

Perennials for Colour

Anemone Japanese..................................Pink/White blooms

Anise Hyssop...............................................Lavender -flowering since late May and fragrant

Aster................................................................Blue blooms

Cardinal Flower...........................................Scarlet blooms

Chrysanthemums.......................................A wide variety of colourful blooms

Coneflower...................................................Purple/Yellow/White/Raspberry/Red blooms

Coral Bells....................................................Red/Pink/White- flowering since June.  Available in many foliage colours.

Coreopsis ....................................................Yellow/White -flowering since June

Gaillardia.......................................................Red/Yellow/Orange- flowering from June

Globe Thistle...............................................Blue blooms

Hibiscus (Mallow).......................................White/Red/Pink/Maroon blooms

Liatris (Gay Feather)..................................Purple/White blooms

Phlox..............................................................Purple/Pink/White- flowering since July and fragrant

Rudbeckia...................................................Yellow blooms

Sedum..........................................................Pink/Mauve blooms

Sneezeweed..............................................Bronze/Yellow/Red blooms

Yarrow...........................................................Yellow/Pink blooms

 

 

Vines with Fall Interest

Colourful vines such as Boston Ivy and Virginia Creeper (Engelmann’s Ivy) are highly colourful in fall. Virginia Creeper bears a heavy crop of black berries.

Think container fall gardening too with arrangements of ornamental cabbage and kale, along with Mums, and ornamental grasses. A fall perennial arrangement is spectacular in colour.

The plants listed will let you take advantage of the change of season and keep your garden interesting and colourful until the heavy frosts and first snow of winter.


Grow A Fence - Plant A Hedge

Hedges have been a part of landscapes for centuries. Whether planted for privacy screens or for ornamental value, there are lots of plants to choose from.

What is the purpose of hedging?

Hedges can be tall windbreaks of conifers striding across the skyline, the green stuff between your house and the road or a neat, step-over edging to a path. Whatever form it takes, a well-grown hedge adds cohesion to a garden and also solves design problems by providing shelter, privacy and uniformity.

The simplest hedge is a row of closely planted, dense shrubs that create a green wall either along a boundary or within a garden. However, there are many other hedges that can be grown and they can become an important part of your property.

Hedges up to 3 feet

Hedges at this height create a softer visual barrier between properties while blending in with multiple landscape schemes. These low hedges can mark the boundary of your property without losing much space or reducing light the way traditional hedging can. This low hedging can also be used as a feature within other plantings or as a feature against walls or fencing.

Consider these plants for maintaining up to a 3 foot hedge (pruning will maintain the height you want)

Deciduous Varieties

These shrubs will exfoliate their leaves in winter.

Barberry – These shrubs have unique foliage varying in different hues of burgundy and pink to green and yellow. The leaves remain through to fall and the berries persist into winter. Likes sun but can take part shade. Zone 4. A great choice, to deter animals and trespassers alike, as the branches sport thorns.

Dwarf Burning Bush – Green leaves in spring summer with a radiant red colour in fall.  Winter berries. Likes the sun and is happy down to zone 3.

Hydrangea (Bobo) - An attractive dwarf variety that provides an abundance of conical white flowers over an extended period of time. Zone 4b and will do just fine in sun or partial shade.

Hydrangea (Macrophylla variety) - These shrubs burst with blue, pink, even red large mop head flowers. Zones 4, 5.  Likes sun to part shade.

Potentilla – A wide variety of shrubs with pink, white or yellow blooms that continue from June until frost. Hardy to zone 2b, and likes sun to part shade.

Privet- Privet is a fast growing shrub that tolerates a wide range of conditions. Vigorous grower that rebounds quickly after heavy pruning. It has panicles of fragrant white flowers in spring with berries persisting into winter. Grows well in sun to part shade hardy to zone 3.

Roses – Most any shrub rose makes for a most colourful hedge. With many varieties and growing heights to choose from, one can have a vibrant colour hedge. Needs full sun tolerant to zone 4b.

Spirea – A most versatile choice for deciduous hedging as there are numerous varieties suitable for different heights of hedging. Foliage ranges from dark to lime green with different assorted colours of flowers. Some varieties blooming from July to frost. Hardy to zone 3b and likes full sun.

Weigela – ‘Fine Wine’ or ‘Spilled Wine’ make a perfect low mounding hedge with rich burgundy foliage and pink trumpet shaped flowers in spring that attract hummingbirds. Matures to 3 feet high, likes full sun and is hardy to zone 4a.

Evergreens and Broadleaf Evergreens suitable for up to a 3 foot high hedge: (Pruning will maintain the height you want)

Boxwood – (Broadleaf) Boxwood has fine, deep green leaves and makes the perfect low growing hedge plant for edging a pathway or formal garden. Its low, dense foliage lends itself to shearing and creating a variety of looks for your garden design.   ‘Green Mountain’, ‘Green Gem’ and ‘Green Velvet’ are all suitable for a low hedge throughout the entire season.

Euonymus – (Broadleaf) ‘Emerald n’ Gold’ is a dwarf variety with foliage all year round. Featuring stunning yellow variegated evergreen leaves that turn shades of pink in fall through winter. Other euonymus choices include Sarcoxie an all green variety, and Emerald Gaiety variety sporting white and green foliage.

Dense Yew –Glossy green foliage with an upright habit makes this a good choice for hedging. Easy to control the habit of this shrub with pruning. It does well in sun and full shade with a height of 3-6 feet and a 6 foot spread at maturity. Under ideal conditions this shrub can live up to 50 years.

 

Hedges 3-6 feet

Medium or low hedges are grown between two and five feet tall. They are used to define space and direct traffic, but do not completely shield one location from another. View them like a fence low enough so that you can still talk to the neighbors.

Hedge your beds and hide away.  Hedges at this height are used more for privacy or establishing different areas within a landscape by creating a colourful boundary.

Deciduous Varieties

These shrubs exfoliate their leaves during winter. (Pruning will maintain the height you want)

Dogwood – ‘Red Osier’ features green leaves on red stems. The stems are stunning in the winter.  Hardy to zone 2, and likes sun to part shade.

Hydrangea - (zone 3 for sun to part shade) There are more varieties to choose from when considering this range of height.

·       ‘Annabelle’ grows to a height of approximately 4 feet. A hardy, showy shrub which features enormous ball-shaped white flower heads in mid- summer, lasting for a long time.

·       ‘Little Lime’ offers bold conical chartreuse flowers with creamy white overtones at the ends of the branches from mid-summer to late fall.

·       ‘Bloomstruck’ features showy balls of violet flowers with blue overtones at the ends of the branches from early summer to early fall.(zone 4)

Dwarf Korea Lilac – This dense shrub grows to 4 -5 feet tall at maturity.  It is smothered in fragrant tiny purple flowers emerging in spring. Prefers sun and is hardy to zone 3.

Ninebark (Little Devil) – A compact upright shrub with showy burgundy leaves. It has clusters of white flowers in early summer. The leaves turn purple in the fall with little red capsules. Zone 2 sun to part shade.  ‘Nugget’ Variety features bright green leaves and reaches 6 feet.

Forsythia – Sporting bright yellow flowers in spring, this shrub will feature a 6 foot hedge.  It continues to become a dense green hedge in summer through to fall.  Would like sun, and is a zone 4a. Deer don’t care for this plant.

Alpine Currant - An excellent medium-sized hedge or screening plant, densely branched with leaves to the ground, takes pruning extremely well, tough and adaptable; small yellow flowers in spring, good fall colour.  Performs well in sun or shade.

Evergreens and Broadleaf Evergreens suitable for a 3 -6 foot high hedge:

(Pruning will maintain the height you want)

Mugo Pine - A compact 4 foot evergreen garden shrub with short, bluish-green dense needles that hold well throughout the season. Hardy to zone 3, it likes full sun to partial shade.

Yew – ‘Fairview’ variety matures to 5 – 6 feet and takes pruning very well. A distinctive and versatile evergreen shrub with striking dark green dense foliage. Likes sun to full shade and is hardy to zone 4a.

Cypress – ‘Sungold’ or ‘Lemonthread’  False cypress is a cultivar of threadleaffalse cypress with fine, almost string-like golden foliage all season long, giving an extremely fine texture, ideal for color and texture detail in the garden. Sungold False cypress has attractive gold foliage. The threadlike leaves are highly ornamental and turn yellow in fall.  Zone 4 and likes sun to partial shade.

Holly – (Broadleaf) The attractive, evergreen foliage and brilliant red berries of the Holly plants make striking hedges that provide constant cover throughout the year. Growing to a height of 5-6 feet, they like part shade sites.  The variety ‘Blue Prince/Princess’ has both male and female plants needed to cross pollinate. Plant in acidic soil for best results.  Zone 5.

Juniper – Gold cone is a nice golden evergreen to use for a hedge. Many other varieties in hues of green, blue, and yellow are also available. These plants like sun and are hardy to zone 5.

 

Hedges 6-10 feet

Hedges at this height make a superb privacy screen.

Deciduous Varieties

These shrubs and trees will exfoliate leaves during winter. (Pruning will maintain the height you want)

Lilac - looks delicate, but they can be an excellent wind and sound barrier. Their lovely, fragrant spring blooms and dense foliage make them an excellent choice for an informal hedge.

Viburnum – ‘Nannyberry’ is native to Ontario and blooms creamy flowers in spring. This shrub can be maintained at any height and matures over 8 feet high. Purple leaves feature berries in the fall for birds. Full sun to partial shade.

Burning Bush – This non dwarf variety can reach up to 8 feet at maturity with a show of crimson fall colour. Can take part shade and it hardy to zone 3.

Limelight Hydrangea - features enormous, dense upright panicles of flower heads that start out a soft lime green, fading over the summer to white and finally brown in fall, one of the hardier selections to zone 3a. Takes sun to shade. Planted about 4-5 feet apart these shrubs create a beautiful hedge from spring through to winter.

Rose of Sharon – With blooms from bottom to top of this shrub, a colourful hedge is a sure bet with varieties ranging from blue to white to pink and everything in between. It prefers sun, and is hardy to zone 5a. A later bloomer in summer.

Japanese Variegated Willow – ‘Flamingo’ or Hakura Nishiki’ varieties feature a yellow- green leaf with a pink tinge on the tops in spring.  It likes the sun to part shade and is hardy to zone 5.

Evergreens and Broadleaf Evergreens suitable for a 6 - 10 foot high hedge:

(Pruning will maintain the height you want)

White Cedar – A native to Ontario, this evergreen is by far the most popular hedging plant.  Cedar hedges can be maintained at any height desired. Likes sun, and is hardy to zone 2.

Juniper – Consider ‘Mountbatten’ or ‘Wichita’ for year round screening. Prefers sun, hardy to zone 3.

De Groot Spire Cedar – Typically grown as a hedge.  A very dense shrub with attractive dark green wrinkled foliage and a narrow growth habit. Hardy to zone 3.  Sun to part shade.

 

Tall Hedges

For large scale screening where space is not an issue, consider the following choices:

Poplar

English or Crimson Spire Oak

Columnar Beech

Armstrong Maple

Multi-stemmed Serviceberry

Hornbeam

Blue Spruce, White Spruce, Norway Spruce

White Pine

Hemlock

Fir

Cedar

Don’t forget ornamental grasses

There are many varieties of ornamental grasses to choose from. Several of these grasses grow to be up to 12 feet in height, making them perfect for privacy. Grasses are excellent noise barriers as well and have attractive blooms that persist well into the winter months for aesthetic appeal. In the breeze, grasses add movement and sound to the garden.

Consider a Hedgerow

A hedgerow is a mix of deciduous and evergreens of various sizes that, combined, will contribute texture, shape, contrast and colour to the overall garden scheme. It will provide food, protection from predators, nesting sites and shelter from the elements for birds, bees, frogs and other creatures.

The plants should be placed 3 or 4 feet apart. The idea is to have them grow into each other, branches intermingling. The beauty of hedgerows is that they merge with additional plantings in garden beds; with no clear line between what is the hedge and what is the border.

Unify the diversity through a color scheme or repetition that ties everything together.

Traditionally, hedgerows include such things as Rose Rugosa, Mock orange, Little Lime Hydrangea,  Weigela, Spirea, Barberry and many more.

Whether used as a decorative feature, a privacy screen or to help define areas of the garden, hedges add a touch of formality to your outdoor space.

There is no end to the possibilities a hedge can provide. Go ahead, experiment. Plant a hedge, or two or three.

 


Gardening At Your Cottage

The natural beauty and plant life found in Canada’s cottage country is enough to inspire any gardener.  A garden and a little landscaping can go a long in way in beautifying your home away from home’s exterior.

Gardening is a much simpler affair at the cottage. You want to keep your property as natural as possible to preserve the nature around you.

Go casual - The cottage garden is much more informal so relax with your layout. If you don't want to spend your vacation watering and weeding, try to choose plants with requirements that closely match the conditions of your site. Go native—plants that are indigenous are more likely to survive without too much handholding. Drought resistant plants make an excellent choice, especially if you are at your retreat only on weekends. Plants to consider include Eastern White Cedar, White Pine, Gray Dogwood, Florida Dogwood, Sugar Maple, Downy Serviceberry, White Birch, Anemone Canadensis, and Engelmann’s Ivy to name a few.

Containers are your friends – Create a variety of styles, colours and sizes of different containers to decorate your deck, entrances, or even the dock. Play around and get creative, the possibilities are endless. Consider the Weekender Planter. It is a planter with a water reservoir for when you are not there.

Build up the shoreline - Most cottage waterfronts have been stripped of the native shrubs, trees, grasses and other plants that act as a buffer and stop erosion. Replanting these native species is one of the best things you can do for your lake.  Most of these plants are low maintenance so once planted you can sit back and enjoy the view.

 

You don’t have to leave the pleasures of gardening behind when you venture out of the city.  Bring along your passion for plants to your getaway spot!


Vertical Gardening

Grow Up!

Vertical gardens are one of the hottest new garden trends and yet, it's one of the oldest (have you ever grown a vine on a fence or trellis?). A vertical garden is a wonderful addition to most landscapes.

Vertical garden elements can draw attention to an area or disguise an unattractive view. In a vertical garden, use structures or columnar trees to create vertical gardening rooms or define hidden spaces ready for discovery. Trellises, attached to the ground or in large containers, allow you to grow vines, flowers, and vegetables vertically.

Chores like weeding, watering and fertilizing, are reduced considerably as vertical gardens use much less space than traditional gardens.

Plants to consider when creating vertical gardens include:

Perennial Choices: Clematis, Honeysuckle, Roses, Trumpet vine, Dutchman’s pipe, Bittersweet, Silverlace and Hydrangea

Annual Choices: Black-eyed Susan, Morning Glory, Nasturtium and Mandevilla

Shade Choices: Kiwi, Chocolate vine (Akebia), Dutchman's pipe and climbing hydrangea

Edible Choices: Kiwi, grapes, hops, and edible flowers such as vining nasturtiums, and vegetables such as peas, squash, tomatoes, and pole beans.

 

Get your Support

Fences, arbors, trellises, obelisks, and other types of structures make it easy to grow plants in vertical gardens. If you have an existing structure such as a shed or garage, add a trellis in front of one of the walls so vertical garden plants have a structure to support their stems..

 

Climbing plants are extremely versatile and particularly valuable in confined areas where they enable gardeners to make the best use of all available space.

 

Get creative with climbing plants and add heights to your summer!


Why We Love Evergreens

It’s hard to imagine a winter without beautiful evergreen conifer trees providing us with constant protection, beauty and gifts to see us through the cold months ahead.

Since evergreens continue to produce throughout the year, they are largely responsible for supporting wildlife during the winter.  Berries, nuts and cones are essential to wildlife, while birds can be sheltered within the foliage.

Backdrop – You can create a beautiful backdrop you can enjoy all year round. By choosing different varieties you can vary the shades of green to create a very pleasing display.  Dark green varieties will accentuate bright colours and will enhance your fall coloured shrubs or trees.

Borders – Outline your beds and paths with dwarf versions that will accentuate these key areas of landscape design all year round.

Groundcover– Low lying species of spreading evergreen can create a beautiful carpet of green when needed.

Hide areas of your home – Have some unsightly areas around your home you would rather not see all the time? Evergreens are a great way to hide your homes foundation, water faucets, water meters and any other area you may not like.

Reduce Energy Cost- Keep cold winter winds from pulling all the heat from your home with a windbreak. Plant evergreen trees on the north or east side of your home and watch your savings grow.

Privacy –One of the most common ways to use evergreens is as a screen in the landscape.

Living Fencing with Evergreen Hedges

Create private outdoor living spaces, buffer noise, or block wind with an evergreen hedge. These top plant picks to make your choice easy.

 

Cedars are the number one choice for an evergreen hedge.  They are virtually disease and pest resistant and make a great screen, windbreak, muffle sound or to create privacy.

Boxwood sets the standard for formal clipped hedges. Its ability to withstand frequent shearing and shaping into perfect geometric forms makes this evergreen a popular border plant. You can also let it grow tall to provide a screen.

Yews are adaptable to sun or shade, yew is a versatile evergreen with few pest problems as long as it has good soil drainage. Many varieties are available, with mounded to upright growth from 5 to 10 feet tall.  It withstands shearing, making it popular for formal hedges.

Spruce can grow up to 60 feet, making a solid hedge for privacy and wind break.


Water Gardening

Consider the benefits of installing a fountain to enhance your living space –

Fountains are easy to maintain, require a smaller footprint than other water features, and are less of a financial and time commitment than a pond.

Fountains are available in a multitude of sizes allowing them to be installed in almost any size space you wish. The only limitation is you must have electricity available. Fountains attract birds to your yard and are less maintenance than a bird bath as the water in motion.

Standalone fountains are gaining popularity due to their ease of set-up and maintenance. All you need to do is add water, plug it in and enjoy!

From natural stone DIY fountain kits starting under $100.00 to more elaborate features such as textured basalt sets of columns, you can choose what will bring the best experience to your personal living space. Add a little water music to your yard.


The Dirt On Bare Root...

Bare root trees and shrubs are dug while dormant and stored without any soil around their roots. We heel the trees and shrubs into soil while they are still dormant; there is just a small window of opportunity to purchase them.

Select your tree and we will prepare it for travel.

Please keep the roots moist in the plastic bag until you are ready to plant, usually ideal within 24 hours.

Prepare your planting hole by digging a little wider than the span of your roots.

The tree will require bone meal to stimulate the root growth, Myke to help the roots assimilate moisture and nutrients from the earth, and composted manure as an organic fertilizer. The trees may need to be staked, and remember to mulch, to ensure moisture retention and keep the weeds away.

Bare root nursery stock is sold at a discounted price, 30% off.


Treescaping Your Home

Before you decide where your trees should go, you should first identify areas of the yard where you need to accomplish a certain goal.

In the woods, nature chooses random places for trees.  In a yard, a more methodical approach is required. The placement of trees determines, how well, different sizes, shapes, and colors harmonize with one another and flatter your home.

Consider:

Shelter – plant shade trees to cool your home and conserve energy.  Properly placed trees can reduce home energy consumption up to 15% by providing shade for roofs, walls and windows. Shade trees include: Maples, Oak , Lindens,  Honey Locust, and Tulip Trees to name just a few.

Adding value to your home – trees strengthen the maturity and marketability of your home.  Correct placement of trees allows you to celebrate your home’s architecture. They provide the ultimate "curb appeal" by impressing buyers before they even walk into your home. Consider Autumn Blaze/ Fantasy Maple, Honey Locust, Beech, Serviceberry …

Screening and Privacy – Plant trees to screen undesirable views and to provide a privacy buffer.  White cedar is known for its year round screening.  Fast growing, and easily pruned to the height and width you require.  Others to consider are Hornbeam, Yews, Spruce…

Accent - An accent tree can contribute a lot to a garden's design. Trees with attractive flowers and berries can become a focal point during their blooming season. Ornamental trees can include Japanese Maple, Stewartia, Hydrangea Standard, Flowering Dogwood, Crabapple